..washing cloth..

19761812_131259397461335_3849197175833624576_n.jpg

 

laundry mark j370.    reminds how fortunate we are*

 

now.

 

we visit museums;

some travel to japan.

 

the circle, the cloth,

 

red thread,  google them……………………                 .. Dewi.

 

so we weave and sew, those with empathy understand,

others don’t*

 

wash the cloth to prove a point.*

 

it is a fragile thing, hesitant in the making. never

complete, it hangs by a thread.

 

never secure.*

 

how fortunate we are.

 

now.

 

sbm.

 

#note 1. circle

i had been using the circle for a while in my work.

while I was sat by the bedside, it came into my head that the circle should be the focus of my work.

it had to be done, and so it was, and so it is.

it will continue. alpha & omega
#note 2. the cloth.

 

comfort bound in clean linen.

arises with perfume, an uncertain memory.

what else will you expect of me . that, mis

spellings or rags.

 

#note 3. red thread.

 

 The red string of fate, also referred to as the red thread of destiny, red thread of fate, and other variants, is an East Asian belief originating from Chinese legend and is also used in Japanese legend. According to this myth, the gods tie a red cord around the ankles of those that are to meet one another in a certain situation or help each other in a certain way. Often, in Japanese culture, it is thought to be tied around the little finger. According to Chinese legend, the deity in charge of “the red thread” is believed to be Yuè Xià Lǎo (月下老, often abbreviated to “Yuèlǎo” [月老]), the old lunar matchmaker god .

The two people connected by the red thread are destined , regardless of time, place, or circumstances. This magical cord may stretch or tangle, but never break. This myth is similar to the Western concept of soulmates or a destined flame.

 

(notes for Morrigan, May the first cabinet be locked, the second also, yet leaving the red key in, please?).

 

 

we have more notes to suffer.

they are not mentioned here.

 

 

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